NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion Charles And Ron Fernando Alberto Domingo Zapata

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Charles and Ron     Fernando Alberto    Domingo Zapata

Verve Fashion Shows

The Charles and Ron line is referred to as a “lifestyle” brand. Wearable, fluid, colorful, it reflects an Afro-Mediterranean sensibility of their Maltese origins. There is a distinct awareness of accessorizing their caftans, tunics and shifts with matching belts and handbags. While Malta is considered a part of Europe, it’s history and location has strong North African and Roman roots. Charles and Ron’s color combination are much closer in alignment in color to Africa and in design to the warmer climates of flowing, open garments in blocky shapes that are pulled into shape by their accessories.

  • hillip Wong –

Fernando Alberto is designs in Los Angeles, produces in Mexico and Spain and is a third generation fashion designer. Although he has a deep background in fashion, his designs, choice of textiles and prints ielegant, modern and bold at the same time. He has an understanding of how tmix boldness with subtlety, how to use complex prints in specific shapes anwhen not to.

His background is reflected through his prism of nuance and taste. There is bold, unapologetic sexiness coupled with diaphanous subtle statement. The choice of religious iconography printed on some the textiles is both referential to his style and a historical context.

– Phillip Wong –

Domingo Zapata isn’t a fashion designer, but his artistry has been on display globally and his association with the AIDS Healthcare Foundation gave a presentation of original graffiti-like work on naked bodies, pieces of clothing and a wide range of participants. In an overt reaction to the Trumpian call for nationalism and xenophobia, men in gowns, kids, men and women in underwear, a pregnant woman, people of all sexual preferences and gender
identification, all with inclusive messages painted by Zapata, were met with
standing ovations and cries of welcome and support.

-Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion Mac Duggal Lulu Harazin Lisa Thon Weiling Chang

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Mac Duggal     Lulu Harazin    Lisa Thon    Weiling Chang

Verve Fashion Shows

          Mac Duggal once again showcased a collection worthy of a praise during the Art Heart NYFW 2018. Following his strong presence from last season, Mac Duggal integrated a message of inclusion and body positivity with his Spring/Summer 2018 collection. The runway was embellished with dresses elaborate in details and bold hues of different shades. There were asymmetric cuts and implementations of lace, beadings, fringe, and more perfectly accentuating the body of the models. This dramatization of details complemented the moody setting inside the gothic synagogue in which sat a sea of a star-studded audience. Amidst the crowd however, the combination of plus size models and regular models who carried the looks seemed to be the biggest stars of them all.

 

          The variety is what first propelled Mac Duggal into becoming a fan favorite for wearable dresses. Dresses and models on the runway showed a fuse of positivity and regularity that should be more commonly implemented in current runways. With this collection pursuing a controversial topic, it seems that Mac Duggal successfully exhibited the many ways glamour can be displayed, not only on the dresses but also for the wearer.                                      

-Leanna Franco-

          A depiction of elegance and intricacy, Lulu Harazin brought a piece of her roots to stun the audience in Angel Orensanz Center. For her Spring/Summer 2018 collection, Lulu Harazin focused on haute couture and kaftans, which were a huge trend of the past. In the mid-19th century, kaftans emerged in full storm, taking over many Vogue covers with high-fashion houses such as Christian Dior and Halston. These adaptations heightened the interest in the exotic prints and embellishments as well as the loose-fitting shapes during the time. Fast forward to the 21st century, kaftans are back exuding the ultimate Bohemian grace with embellishments glistening with every step.

 

          Lulu Harazin’s collection showcases these familiar styles while also putting haute couture on the forefront. Using fabrics and materials from all over the world, Harazin was able to create patterns of eastern influences to walk alongside western silhouettes in perfect harmony.

– Leanna Franco –

Lisa Thon is one of the established fashion designers designing in Puerto Rico (Stella Nolasco is another), but Thon has been showing in New York since 2006 and she was well received with her hippie (or bohemian) prints and oversized hats giving an island sensibility to her collection.

  

   This collection was about comfort and flow, reflecting a culture of island rather than the ice of winter. Some of the more interesting embellishments were long fringe coming from the shoulders of one dress, print belts on solid colored dresses, and dresses and tops created from ties sewn together in strips.

Bright colored faux fur coats layered over gauzy, light dresses and brightly patterned one piece shapes. Easy to see, easy to wear, and well received.  

 

– Phillip Wong –

The Weiling Chang collection at Art Hearts is beautifully designed but a curious mix. All pieces had an elegance, but classic business wear, along with evening, jumpers, strappy tops with a suggestion of fetish, were exhibited with motorcycle jackets, trench coats, and waist coats.

   While the placement of all these pieces was curious, the styling works with each outfit and it struck me that small designers are only able to show a piece or two at a time – while their creativity and thoughtfulness of design wants to do much more. 

 

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion Candice Cuoco Danny Nguyen Willfredo Gerardo

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Candice Cuoco   Danny Nguyen   Willfredo Gerardo

Verve Fashion Shows

          Candice Cuoco has shown globally and has appeared in television competitions. Her presentation is bold, provocative and assured. Using veils like Mardi Gras masks and she uses leather strapping and collars that have a fetish feel. But Cuoco’s sensibilities are complex, a liberal use of leather based pieces and printed fabric layers, with the floral suggestions of Aubrey Beardsley sketches or an Oscar Wilde tale, her work has an 1890s or 1980s cultured ennui. While the apparel industry represents designers as unique individuals while trying to sell hundreds and thousands of units, Cuoco refers Betty Page, Patricia Field in a highly stylized line which demands attitude and assurance for a woman to wear.Cuoco designs for blatant décor but always an underlying sexuality.

           Danny Nguyen is bold, direct and distinctive. His mustache reminds us of Salvador Dali, but his line has a stronger men’s side than women’s.His women’s line uses body conforming pieces with beautiful flowing iridescent fabrics to frame the figure. The men’s line uses a wider range of fabrications,colors and textures on blazers, and trousers that radiate both elegance (which can also be seen in his women’s line) and wit.

          Willfredo Gerardo designs for mermaids. With Hollywood-inspired form-fitting dresses in aquamarine exaggerated dropped sleeves, flowing trails and plunging necklines, his work is made for runways and red carpets. Coming from North Hollywood, you can see references in his transparent body shapes, the workmanship of sequins, filigree and iridescence, to Bob Mackie, and earlier, Adrian, Travis Banton and EdithHead.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion - Lily Marotto Eva Habashi A Modo Mio

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Lily Marotto   Eva Habashi    A Modo Mio

Verve Fashion Shows

          Lily Marotto’s line, shown at Art Hearts group shows emphasized beautiful prints and custom printed fabrics. A wide range of themes featuring dancers and skaters, goddesses and varying exotic birds, the line suggests a complexity blending shape of each dress working with the artwork or print designated for that item.

          Lily Marotto has lived and worked in Paris, London, Milan and New York, Her eclectic interests are reflected in the artists she collaborates with.

          Egyptian designer Eva Habashi uses different items on a small line that has classic forms, but a mix of lace and tulle to create wider skirting, a softer, see-through feel and molded breastplates that create strong defined shapes and sometimes suggest Roman military forms. Some of the gowns and cocktail dresses have a traditional feel that contrasts.

           A Modo Mio is a Colombian line designed by Francesca Sesana.Her line is a mix of textures and layers with transparent skirts and overlaying jackets or tops. Every piece seems to show a combination of flamboyant street sense with daring laces, tulles or mesh layers. She uses floral patterns, camo, denim and leather jackets that establish boldness.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Verve Fashion Shows

Just as each designer approaches the design and fashion
industry (and their own businesses) differently, group showings are approached
by the show producers differently.

Some want to benefit the fashion industry (and industries that go along with it), while others just want to make money by having a show that they don’t have to pay for. The fact is, a fashion line launch can be astronomical for a small
designer. But it can also be an efficient way to introduce a line to press, and might be the only way a designer’s line can be seen.

Producers like Kelly Cutrone’s People’s Revolution and the Council of Aspiring American Fashion Designers (CAAFD), curate the work of designers and try to show lines that are distinctive, different and producible. Other designers showing with Art Hearts Fashion, The Society Fashion Week, and the Social Network’s Underground Fashion reach a combination of consumers and press.

Verve Fashion Magazine tries to see as much as possible to get new and emerging and transitional lines on our radar.

There are also questions of “What is Fashion?” and “What is Art?” and we’ll discuss that the same way The Food Network expanded the concept of food, diversity, differences and how they impacted the food industry. Food isn’t just packaged food in the frozen food section, but has expanded geometrically to encompass a wide variety of access points, distributions, taste and health interests, economic and grower’s limitations.

Our interest is in the highest of the high-end iconic design houses, but we are interested both in design and accessibility to a global market.

So our fashion looks is a mix of design and shill. This was our approach to group shows.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Group Shows -

NYFW AW18

Group Shows

Art Hearts Fashion/CAAFD/Style Fashion Week/The Society

Verve Fashion Shows

          There were a number of group shows during New York Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 18. Some of the shows were simply taking advantage of the excitement of “fashion” coming to New York at a fixed time, but some group shows try to introduce new, emerging, or unknown designers to a larger audience.

 

          Just as each designer approaches the design and fashion industry (and their own businesses) differently, group showings are approached by the show producers differently.

          Some productions want to benefit the fashion industry (and industries that go along with it), while others just want to make money by having a show that they don’t have to pay for. The fact is, a fashion line launch can be astronomical for a small designer. But it can also be an efficient way to introduce a line to press, and might be the only way a designer’s line can be seen.

          Producers like Kelly Cutrone’s People’s Revolution and the Council of Aspiring American Fashion Designers (CAAFD), curate the work of designers and try to show lines that are distinctive, different and producible. Other designers showing with Art Hearts Fashion, The Society Fashion Week, and the Social Network’s Underground Fashion, reach a combination of consumers and press.

       Verve Fashion Magazine tries to see as much as possible to get new and emerging and transitional lines on our radar.

         There are also questions of “What is Fashion?” and “What is Art?” and we’ll discuss that the same way The Food Network expanded the concept of food, diversity, differences and how they impacted the food industry. Food isn’t just packaged food in the frozen food section, but has expanded geometrically to encompass a wide variety of access points, distributions, taste and health interests, economic and grower’s limitations.

         Our interest is in the highest of the high-end iconic design houses, but we are interested both in design and accessibility to a global market.

           So fashion looks can be mix of design and shill. Our approach to group shows was to see everything and sort it out later.                                – Phillip Wong –



NYFW AW18 Ruth Zabetta

NYFW AW18

Ruth Zabetta

Verve Fashion Shows

           The CAAFD presentation finished with Ruth Zabetta Couture’s  line which also was a predominantly black and white showing. Zabetta uses strong angles: triangular constructions in collars, shoulder pieces or tops.

           The initial jacket with exaggerated shoulders surprises, followed by strong three-dimensional triangles on collars and as color accents. But most of Zabetta’s shapes suggest Japanese traditional kamishimos, kimonosor hakamas. Waist length jacket topswere belted with a rope, but other dresses follow the angular motif.

                                                                                                  

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Port Zienna

NYFW AW18

Port Zienna

Verve Fashion Shows

          Port Zienna AW18 collection shows Francesca Canepa’s affinity for couture draping and shape manipulation. Each piece of a predominantly black and white showing played with straight lines, asymmetrical draping, or classical shapes.

 

          While blacks, whites and shades in between focus on how blacks pieces rest in a white field, a sense of austerity continues with the simplicity of dresses, long coats in minimal pieces. While traditional couture draping suggests the gathering to emphasize the bodies shape, Canepa’s draping emphasizes a fluidity of movement beneath a simple fall of cloth.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Mouton Blanc

NYFW AW18

Mouton Blanc

Verve Fashion Shows

           The Council of Aspiring American Fashion Designers produced a group show of three designers: Mouton Blanc, Port Zienna and Ruth Zabetta.

           Mouton Blanc is the line of Japanese designer Hayako Miya. There are elements of fantasy and strength in this dark layered collection. Miya works with lace, draping , texture and illusion. He creates pieces and combinations that obfuscates the face while allowing the eyes to see. It is reminiscent of Islamic burqas or Japanese ninjas.

            At the same time,the lace, with suggestive layers create an openness that belies either of those two suggestive cultural touchstones.

            While there is much that is fantastical in this collection (full length transparent lace dresses hiding the facial features), there is also a reality of lace layers with grey or black wool, plaids that are layered or mixed in skirts, hoodie jackets at hip length.

           Length and weight of coats, jackets and skirts all vary in fabrication and texture.     

                                                                                                   -Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Amehl by Amanda Mehl

NYFW AW18

Amehl

Verve Fashion Shows

       In a parody of awards ceremonies and the citations, certificates and trophies which Amanda Mehl says, defines our society, Amehl presented her AW18 line in a storefront converted into a performance space with mock red carpet and her eclectic line worn by all contenders.

        Amanda Mehl is ambitious with her ideas and her intents. Her line is surprisingly wearable and the details of each piece fits a combination of downtown chic and details that aren’t as ironic as the performances she produces.

        Metallic foiled fabric in cocktail dresses, fringed or lace edged, the pieces are all well done. Other combinations suggest cheerleaders, Star Trek , beauty pagents and fabrics used for wall hangings. The wit and references are unavoidable, but each piece is a done well. And many of the items would go over well at Comic Con.

– Phillip Wong –